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Sep-2015

Josh’s Blog. Back 2 Europe 2015! August 31st, Bayeux Tapestry.

Karen   /  

Hi all,

Yesterday was Bayeaux Tapestry day. As Mum wanted to see it and couldn’t because of closing times last trip to Europe, we had to all get in the car and see a 1000 year old piece of cloth. Wow. No, actually, it was very good. On a rainy Monday morning we all hopped in the car to see this monumental cloth. After zipping around Bayeux for a while, our trusty NavMan directed us all to the front of the museum (it was actually the car park as the museum is between car-less streets.). After walking up a wet cobblestone track, we arrived at the museum, and proceeded to the exhibition. It was amazing. Measuring just under 70 metres, the Bayeaux tapestry depicts the build up, and end of the Battle of Hastings, in 1066, where William the Conqueror ‘conquered’ the throne of England. Despite popular belief, the ‘tapestry’ is actually an embroidery. Though many people believe that the embroidery was made by William the Conqueror’s wife, this may not be the case. The Bayeux Tapestry was split up into at least 58 sections, for the commoners to be able to read. It was originally hung along the sides of the cathedral of Bayeux. One part of the Bayeux Tapestry is missing. This is right at the very end. No one knows where it may be. The Tapestry was also used in the French Revolution, to cover up weapons in a cart. Just after that, it was to be torn into strips to decorate a float on the river, but thankfully a general in the army saved it. Apart from the tapestry, the museum had a gallery above. This had lots of interesting information about the magnificent tapestry and its origin. After an inspiring morning viewing a 1000 year old piece of fabric, we (well Dad and Mum) decided to go to Dad’s all time favourite: Carrefour. For those who don’t know, Carrefour is basically a mix between a Kmart, a Coles and an Aldi. You can find anything from Lego, to Playmobil, to prams, to chocolate, to the worlds largest Cucumber (we ate that the next night, it was very filling). I didn’t think much of Carrefour, but Dad looked like he was really enjoying it (I think he got a bit “carried” away as we stayed there for over a hour). While walking back to the car, we were all giving translations to ‘lapin’¬†(rabbit) when some one (me) said that it should be called Le Pain, like Dad’s French. I would rather remain anonymous so I will just put ‘someone’. After stocking up on our food department, we drove back home and Dad, Daniel, Caleb, Matthew and I had a nice soccer game (Matty didn’t do much as he is only two and no real competitor, but give him 5 years, and he’ll be scoring his hundredth goal). We had a nice dinner of Le Boef (stake), Le bean (beans), and Le pototo (potato) followed by Le pomme de la papa (Apple flan). We watched¬†Ratatouille, a rather fitting end to our 3rd night in France. Bye all,

 

Josh

Outside Bayeux Cathedral

Outside Bayeux Cathedral

Inside Bayeux Cathedral. Along the wall is where the Bayeux Tapestry would have hung.

Inside Bayeux Cathedral. Along the wall is where the Bayeux Tapestry would have hung.

One part of the Bayeux Tapestry

One part of the Bayeux Tapestry

Another part of Bayeux Tapestry

Another part of Bayeux Tapestry

A horse in the Bayeux Tapestry

The part in the Bayeux Tapestry where Harold, the king of England is killed (according to the museum) with an arrow in his eye.

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  1. Linbe /

    Hey Josh,
    We love this, waking up in the morning then grabbing the iPad and reading about the day you had while we were sleeping.
    Have you eaten any pastries with the fruit on top of le custard yet? How is the little LUMIX working out?
    Will you use a “guest contributor ” ( C, D or M) for your blog at some stage?

    • kandt /

      Hi Gran and Poppy,

      I have eaten a raspberry one with custard. It was delicious! I have been using the LUMIX from Mont St Michel onwards. It has been good, and I have been able to take more photos with it (as before then we only had one camera). I will get a guest contributor soon, I am not sure when. We are really enjoying our travels here.

      Josh

  2. Sue /

    Hi Josh, you will now be well placed to give a commentary on our McCrae Bayeux painting. My memory of the tapestry was that the colours had faded so much that nothing much stood out. This is certainly not the case with your photos. Could the tapestry’s colours have been restored? Did you see any information about restoration? Yesterday we took Uncle Bob out for lunch for his birthday to Giorgio’s in Armadale and then to see Rose Street where your great great great grandfather had built more than 12 beautiful Victorian houses still standing. Such a beautiful street! Love la grandmama

    • kandt /

      Hi La Grandmama,

      I think your ‘new’ name sounds more Italian than French but as they are only a couple of kilometres away from each other it probably won’t make much difference! The tapestry looked in fine condition, apart from a panel at the end which had faded a bit. There was also a bit which had ‘disappeared’, only to appear in a rich persons house a couple of years later. This was a bit faded as well, but you could only tell from close up. I think the tapestry has undergone a little bit of restoration, but only in the places where it was needed. We are really enjoying our time here.

      Josh

  3. Sue /

    Hi Daniel (in particular but everyone else too),
    Your guest blog entry made me laugh out loud! I shall continue to look forward to all of them.
    Lots of love,
    Le G

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